MOCA: Photographic Art of Prostitution & Progressive Relationships

Real Worlds: Brassaï, Arbus, Goldin reveals the strength in non-conformity, in being unapologetically frank about self-identity, lifestyle, and relationships. This touching, electrifying exhibition walks the viewer through several of the 20th century’s most raw and candid counterculture photographs and boldly declares that there is no wrong way to make a family.


The U.S. Senate is poised to pass legislation that is intended to stop the internet from being used for sex trafficking — a worthy goal aimed at addressing a serious problem. However, the legislation known as the Fight Online Sex Trafficking Act, or FOSTA, could harm the very people that it is intended to protect. FOSTA threatens the lives and safety of sex workers — people who are disproportionately LGBTQ and people of color. The legislation does this through a dangerously broad definition of “promotion of prostitution,” which is not limited to trafficking and could sweep in any trading of sex for money or other goods

Why Sex Workers are Fighting the Anti-Sex Trafficking Bill

Guest post by collaborators: M. Dante, Lola Li, and Heather Berg. On March 12th, the Senate votes on SESTA, the Stop Enabling Sex Trafficking Act. SESTA would criminalize the online advertising, information sharing, and support networks that sex workers use to do their jobs safely. Readers can support the #LetUsSurvive campaign by calling their Senators. WE ARE: #SurvivorsAgainstSESTA

Understanding SESTA & FOSTA

Understanding FOSTA & SESTA. PDF (c) Reframe Health & Justice RHJ 2018 The Allow States and Victims to Fight Online Sex Trafficking Act (FOSTA, H.R. 1865) might sound noble, but it would do nothing to stop sex traffickers. What it would do is force online platforms to police their users’ speech more forcefully than ever before, silencing legitimate voices in the process. - EFF