As many of you know, this Philly based blogger traveled on invitation by ESPU_ca and CUSP to Alaska four times between 2012-2014. There I lay witness to the tactics utilized against prostitutes, sex workers and their support community by law enforcement, and individuals impersonating law enforcement for a malevolent purpose. As a result every so often I post updates here. It is interesting to compare / contrast to happenings back here in the Lower 48. It simply is NOT okay for law enforcement to sexually interact with – and then arrest for prosecution or LEAD  –  prostitutes, sex workers or potential trafficking victims; especially not minors as happened more than once in Alameda County, California. Google it or email me for links. HEY ALL – STAND UP FIGHT BACK!  Photo: CUSP at KTVA: Lael Morgan, KRVA staff, M. Dante and Terra Burns 2014

Lael Morgan, KTVA, M Dante and Terra Burns 2014
Read the Reason Magazine article on cops fighting for the right to sexually exploit women during investigations.
The Anchorage Police Department is fighting a pair of state bills that would criminalize cops who have “sexual contact” with people under investigation. The reason for the opposition, according to Deputy Chief Sean Case, is that there are “very, very limited” situations in which cops need to cross that boundary — specifically, when it comes to undercover investigations of sex workers. Re/Post of Article for Vocatic By Tracy Clark-Flory . In an interview with Alaska Dispatch News, Case argued that such a law would allow sex workers to avoid arrest, since it provides them with a way to check if a potential client is a cop. “(In an undercover investigation) they ask one simple question: ‘Touch my breast.’ OK, I’m out of the car. Done. And the case is over,” he told reporter Michelle Theriault Boots. “If we make that act (of touching) a misdemeanor we have absolutely no way of getting involved in that type of arrest.” This is why the Anchorage Police Department has actively lobbied against the companion bills, House Bill 112 and Senate Bill 73, which are currently stuck in committee in the state legislature. The bills classify “sexual penetration” and “sexual contact” in these cases as sexual abuse. Interestingly, Case says the department isn’t interested in making arrests for sex work in general and is instead focused on sex trafficking in particular, which raises the question of whether police are specifically advocating for the need to have “sexual contact” with trafficking victims. Sex worker advocates argue that this — as well as “sexual contact” with independent sex workers — would amount to “state sponsored sexual assault.” The department did not respond to a request for comment by press time. The bills at issue are the result of activism by the Alaska-based Community United for Safety and Protection (CUSP), which alleges that sex workers in the state have been subjected to sexual abuse by police during undercover busts. The group’s website features several testimonials from women with stories of cops allegedly groping and even having “sex” with them during undercover stings. (“Sex” is in quotes here, because under these circumstances it would be based on deceit and is arguably better described as sexual abuse.)“It’s traumatic to be in the middle of a sexual encounter and then suddenly be slapped into hand cuffs,” said Terra Burns of CUSP. “People have told me that years later they still have PTSD symptoms when they see a police car.” Initially, it seemed that the bills would have no trouble passing. “Police and prosecutors insisted that police never engage in sexual conduct during stings anyways,” she said. “Then right as the bill was about to be heard they changed their story and now claim that they need to engage in sexual conduct with sex trafficking victims in order to rescue them.” She adds, “We are calling on our elected officials to say this is wrong, this is criminal behavior, and make it illegal.” Maxine Doogan, a member of CUSP, said she’s relieved to finally see officials acknowledge that there are circumstances under which police would have sexual contact with a sex worker. “I am happy that they’re finally admitting it, and that they’re on record,” she said. This issue isn’t limited to Alaska. Last month, Michigan’s Senate voted to put an end to a law that previously provided immunity for cops who have “sex” with sex workers during the course of an investigation. It was the last state in the U.S. to explicitly allow for police immunity in those circumstances — but sex worker advocates say that every state needs bills like those proposed in Alaska that expressly define “sexual contact” with sex workers during investigations as sexual abuse. That said, these laws only go so far, according to activists. As Maggie McNeill, a sex worker based in New Orleans, told Vocativ, “No matter what the law says, cops will keep raping sex workers, either in stings or outside of them, for as long as our profession is criminalized because they know damned well there’s nothing we can do about it.”
##

For ongoing research and statistics on topic this blog consulted the International Sex Work Foundation for Art Culture and Education (ISWFACE). 

ISWFACE / Police & Prostitites: The ugly truth!

ISWFACE / OPERATION DO THE MATH: Learn the truth about the relationship between law enforcement, sex trafficking, sex work, prostitution, and rape.
USER GUIDE TO OPERATION DO THE MATH for 2014
PDF
Print
E-mail
Written by Norma Jean Almodovar
Sunday, 15 November 2015 15:52
Operation Do the Math– a guide for activists and allies to utilize the data and information in this online resource
USER GUIDE  FOR 2015 WILL BE AVAILABLE SHORTLY! This educational project was funded by ISWFACE– a 501 (c ) 3 non profit organization PLEASE SHARE THIS DOCUMENT AS A COMPANION TO THE LINK TO THE WEBSITE PAGE: OPERATION DO THE MATH Be sure to check out the posters for printing which contain summaries of the numbers from this page, as well as lists of pedophile/ rapist/ domestically violent law enforcement agents who are given the power and authority over the lives of vulnerable people in the sex industry– links to which can be found on the front page of “Police Prostitution and Politics.com

This user guide will help you navigate the massive amount of information on this website. The spreadsheets were created using the FBI stats from its various tables, primarily tables #5 (reported crimes in the US- by state) and #69 (reported arrests from each state.
For the spreadsheets with data relating to the age and gender of those arrested for prostitution and disorderly conduct, the following tables were used: (these links go to the 2014 tables; all the other years can be found by searching for “Crime in the United States” by year- then locate the categories under which they are classified – “persons arrested” and “offenses known to law enforcement” where you can find “reported crimes.”
FBI CRIME IN THE US: Table # 39- 2014 arrests by age- MALE
FBI CRIME IN THE US: Table # 40- 2014 arrests by age FEMALE
FBI CRIME IN THE US: Table # 42 – 2014 arrests by GENDER
Also used were the 1991 to 2014 “Criminal Victimization” reports.
Estimated law enforcement agents in each state “Police Employee Data
Table #77 for law enforcement agents by state, Table #78 for city by city numbers of law enforcement agents.
***Be aware that the numbers vary from one FBI table to the next- sometimes significantly- for the exact same ‘crimes’ and number of arrests. Example- in 2013, the FBI spreadsheet data for the state of Alaska reported there were 647 persons arrested for prostitution, when in fact there were only 47 persons arrested. FBI said it was a typo, but will not correct it because the documents were already published.

Part I is a summary of the other sections, giving overviews of some of the statistics contained within the corresponding section. This is a good section to review the content in all the other parts of this document. All of the sections or parts are available as the whole document or as individual pages, which can be identified by the thumbnail images below the section or part.
Parts II A and II B contain spreadsheets with all the reported crimes and arrests, state by state, analyzing the percentages and numbers of the following:
• How many reported crimes were there in each state for the year 2014? from table #5– total all states 9,475,816
• Of those reported crimes, what percentage of them were solved by arrest? 18.41% or 1,777,909 arrests for reported crimes
How many arrests were made (reported to the FBI) for police instigated activity (NOT reported crimes)? 7,878,000 and how many arrests total were made (according to table #69)? 9,655,898 (this differs from the cover page for the section on the FBI website, off by 1,549,934 arrests…. FBI page says “Nationwide, law enforcement made an estimated 11,205,833 arrests in 2014” but that number doesn’t match the number in table #69
• What percentage of all arrests made were for non reported “crimes” vs. reported crimes where the victim asked for help? 81.59%
What percentage of reported rapes (116,645) were solved through arrests (18,312) of alleged rapists? 15.7% [The above number of reported rapes from table # 5 does not include the reported violent sexual assaults which can be found in the “Criminal Victimization” 2014 report, page # 2- 284,350– this number does include the reported rapes from table 5]
How many arrests for prostitution were there in 2014? 40,578 – how many of these were minors? 607
[note- you can find the number of prostitution arrests in Parts II A and II B, Parts III A and III B and in Part VI]
• Given the number of reported arrests and the number of estimated law enforcement agents in each state, on average, how many arrests does each cop make per year? [15.41 arrests] Estimated number of law enforcement agents in the US in 2014 (from FBI Table # 77) 626,796 (equation: 9,655,898/ 626,796= 15.41).
The FBI report states that arrests for traffic related violations are not included in these numbers. However, there are far more arrests than the ones reported by law enforcement agencies to the FBI. Laws involving ‘quality of life’ municipal code enforcement tickets which are issued.These arrests are also not included in the FBI reports, but they do take up the time and resources of law enforcement, leaving little time to solve REAL, REPORTED crimes.
Part III A and Part III B focuses on state by state of arrests for prostitution from 2000 to 2014.
Part III-A contains spreadsheets of the arrests
Part III B shows the data in a graph, state by state. If you see an article in your local paper claiming that ‘sex trafficking’ is a huge problem in the state in question, simply find the graph for that state, click the link to see exactly how many persons- adults and minors- have been arrested from 2000 to 2014.

Part IV-OPERATION CROSS COUNTRY- WHERE ARE THE VICTIMS” This section covers the annual sting operations from 2011- 2014 involved in ‘rescuing’ the children who are sex trafficked. Some years it takes 50 law enforcement agents to rescue one child. Pages 3 to 6 are from the FBI press releases with stats of arrests in the cities and states the sting takes place. Page 3- 2014 arrests in Alabama to Mississippi | page 4– 2014 arrests in Missouri to Wisconsin | page 5– 2013 arrests Alabama to Nebraska | page 6– 2013 arrests Nevada to Wisconsin
Part V-A Fast Facts uses the stats of the ‘alleged number’ of minors trafficked into prostitution every year, and the number of ‘johns’ they allegedly service on a daily basis to create charts with different variables to calculate the number of ‘johns’ needed to provide employment to those sex trafficking victims.
Part V-A, page 2 shows how many adult prostitutes compared to minors – as well as the number of ‘johns’ it would take to keep them busy, using variables of working 100 days per year with 1 unique ‘john’ per day up to working 200 days per year with 10 unique ‘johns’ per day… [with a total of 500,000 adult and 9,050 minor females, servicing 10 unique ‘johns’ per day for 200 days per year, a total of 1,018,100,000 ‘johns’ would be needed
Part V-A page 3 links to the Polaris Project’s previous “statistics snapshot” of what they claim are the number of ‘johns’ and the number of days that victims are forced to service.
Part V-A page 4 contains the stats from the 2010 US census.
Part V-A page 5 is a spreadsheet with comparisons (from 1991 to 2014) of reported rapes and sexual assaults/ arrests for rapes as compared to arrests for prostitution/ and also comparisons of persons murdered by circumstances- cops/ prostitutes/ rape victims etc./ the number of persons arrested for drug possession. IMPORTANT STATISTIC: the number of rapes and sexual assaults that have gone UNSOLVED over 24 years: 5,599,969: the average percentage of arrests for rape and sexual assault is 10.4%- usually around 5 to 6% per year.
Also important to note that over the 24 years covered in this document, there were 36,464,529 arrests for drug possession/selling etc. The number of arrests for drug possession averages over 1,300,000 per year and yet we have not ‘ended the demand’ for drugs.
Part V-A page 6 is a graph of the murders by circumstances 1991 to 2014: prostitutes, cops, rape victims, children killed by babysitters, persons involved in love triangles.
Part V-B Fast Facts II contains more charts with variables ranging from 500 to 350,000 minors working 100 to 300 days per year, servicing from 1 to 60 ‘johns’ per day. Abolitionists support ‘end the demand’ type legislation which would mandate the arrest of the non violent, non abusive clients, employers and associates of consenting adult sex workers (while claiming to not want to arrest the prostitute).
Part V-B page 6 examines the exaggerated numbers behind the Superbowl hysteria and sex trafficking.
Part VI is one of the most important section of the entire document if you want to respond to the lies that sex trafficking is ‘the fastest growing criminal enterprise.’ The spreadsheet stats cover 34 years of data, from 1981 through 2014 (the most current year for stats). Spreadsheets and graphs include arrests for prostitution AND disorderly conduct.
THERE IS MORE TO VIEW ON ISWFACE: OPERATION DO THE MATH
NUMBERS MATTER! If this information is useful to you and you are inspired to make a tax-deductible donation to help us maintain this site and continue our research,  visit our www.iswface.org website for more information on how to donate (through PayPal, by selecting ISWFACE as your preferred charity on Amazon.com whenever you make a purchase, or check).

One thought on “Update on AK HB 112 / SB 73: Cops On Sexual Contact During  Investigations

  1. An email asking to be left anonymous commented: GET THE FEMALE COPS INVOLVED AND ON OUR SIDE! It is mysogyny. They just need a Female cop to go out with them and be in the wings after the arrest. This clearly happen to me in LA when the male John came in and paid and then they arrested me ( but we didn’t do anything –only my words of aggreeance got me arrested) and then the female cop knocks on the door and asked me over and over did he the male cop touch me because if that were the case the female cop was on my side In Los angeles female cops have to be in the wings awaiting on these sex arrests This law was passed back in the 90’s. It is mysogyny.

Comments are closed.